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  1. #21
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    Thanks for the links!

    Here's another one you might enjoy. The article is a riff off a book by a WaPo writer.
    http://www.nationalreview.com/articl...e-and-glorious

    Music evolves. You can even see the changes over the short span of the Beatles.
    But sometimes it goes down paths which are dead ends.

    Not enough attention has been paid to the fact that there are two kinds of music: dance music and concert music. Rock is still good dance music.

    I'm still looking for the Fender report which says 90% of guitar students drop out in the first year.
    This is as close as I have come so far:
    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...is-begging-you

    "Almost everyone who picks up a guitar, about 90 percent, abandons it within the first year, according to Mooney. Many give up within three months, frustrated or unwilling to commit. Some people bounce to another instrument. And people quit electric guitars more often than acoustic ones, he said, because of the pain factor: Steel strings hurt delicate hands."

    I want to see what he really said without it being filtered through a journalist who probably doesn't even play guitar.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by SouthernGuitarMan View Post
    HaHa, maybe it's the I, IV,vi, V, who knows.
    Exactly right! I'll have to watch "It Might Get Loud" again. Jimmy Page started out doing Skiffle and the mantra for skiffle was "You only need three chords" and you could play lots of songs. Can't argue with that. And with four and a capo you were practically pro. I, IV, V, and maybe a minor chord. This short article says it very well and has some great quotes!

    https://stmargarets.london/archives/...explained.html

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  4. #24
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    It keeps popping up in the news that guitars are dying, most recently prompted by Gibson. Here is Rolling Stone's take on that:
    https://www.rollingstone.com/music/n...s-ever-w520494

    A couple things in that article need comment.

    "Even if today’s music fans are more likely to worship pop stars and rappers than their parents' guitar heroes,"

    There is always an assumption that kids take up guitar because of some rock star. Maybe some kids do, but I hope that they realize that playing guitar may be the least important thing for success in that career. Behind a huge ego, huge ambition, huge obsession, and being alpha male. All joking aside, rock stars do not make very good role models, and there are no guarantees. Somebody must be learning guitar for the fun and enjoyment.

    "As the charts and stages change guard, companies are also stepping outside of a demographic upon which they relied for decades – white, male buyers – to ask themselves: Who were they missing all this time?"

    Again they assume hits charts and big stages are most important. Playing in small venues is important too, even playing covers. It may be the lack of small clubs is most important.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by nwhy View Post
    It keeps popping up in the news that guitars are dying, most recently prompted by Gibson. Here is Rolling Stone's take on that:
    https://www.rollingstone.com/music/n...s-ever-w520494

    A couple things in that article need comment.

    "Even if today’s music fans are more likely to worship pop stars and rappers than their parents' guitar heroes,"

    There is always an assumption that kids take up guitar because of some rock star. Maybe some kids do, but I hope that they realize that playing guitar may be the least important thing for success in that career. Behind a huge ego, huge ambition, huge obsession, and being alpha male. All joking aside, rock stars do not make very good role models, and there are no guarantees. Somebody must be learning guitar for the fun and enjoyment.

    "As the charts and stages change guard, companies are also stepping outside of a demographic upon which they relied for decades – white, male buyers – to ask themselves: Who were they missing all this time?"

    Again they assume hits charts and big stages are most important. Playing in small venues is important too, even playing covers. It may be the lack of small clubs is most important.
    I saw that article. I think another big factor influencing today's music is youtube. People no longer need "that big break". They can put themselves out there and market themselves without a recording contract. Prince contacted a local guy from Topeka here, after seeing him on youtube, and invited him to open for him on his Australian tour. His name is Andy McKee. Orianthi was discovered by Michael Jackson when he saw her on youtube. He immediately flew her to his mansion for an interview, subsequently hiring her as his lead guitarist for his last tour.

    Seeing the number of views people are getting is an enticement to others to emulate what those people are doing. There is a ton of guitar reviewers, and free lessons on youtube, this makes access to learning the instrument easier. The guitar is a relatively inexpensive instrument to take up. You can get a pretty decent instrument for under $600.

    When I look at all the covers and playlists on youtube. I am convinced there is a culture of guitar lovers the recording industry is ignoring. The other phenomena is the proliferation of guitar prodigees like Toby Lee. I have seen a number of others, both boys and girls, who's names I can't recollect right now. I don't know if there is more of them around now than there used to be, or if through the social media they are being brought to light, where in the past they had to be "discovered".

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by BetThisNameAintTaken View Post
    Seeing the number of views people are getting is an enticement to others to emulate what those people are doing. There is a ton of guitar reviewers, and free lessons on youtube, this makes access to learning the instrument easier. The guitar is a relatively inexpensive instrument to take up. You can get a pretty decent instrument for under $600.
    YouTube is great. The internet is incredible. Social Media is scary ... but important.
    It's a great time to learn guitar.

    "When a kid first picks up a guitar or drumstick, it's not really to be famous. It's because that kid wants to fit in somewhere and he wants to be accepted; and he wants to be understood, even."
    -- Don Henley at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony for the Eagles, 1998

    While the guitar companies think that it's the influence of the rock stars, I agree with Don Henley, that the influence of the other kids is most important. If guitar companies want to build future sales, they should promote guitars and guitar classes in high schools. At that age even $600 is a lot of money. But I bet a lot of people looking back at high school can't remember anything important that they learned there, except music.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by nwhy View Post
    YouTube is great. The internet is incredible. Social Media is scary ... but important.
    It's a great time to learn guitar.

    "When a kid first picks up a guitar or drumstick, it's not really to be famous. It's because that kid wants to fit in somewhere and he wants to be accepted; and he wants to be understood, even."
    -- Don Henley at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony for the Eagles, 1998

    While the guitar companies think that it's the influence of the rock stars, I agree with Don Henley, that the influence of the other kids is most important. If guitar companies want to build future sales, they should promote guitars and guitar classes in high schools. At that age even $600 is a lot of money. But I bet a lot of people looking back at high school can't remember anything important that they learned there, except music.
    Yes at that age it is a lot of money. But for the younger kids it is an affordable amount for the parents. My daughter spent that much on fees and equipment for my grandson to play baseball. Almost any other instrument would cost 3 or 4 times that. And for high school kids it is a doable price if they have part time, or summer jobs. Point is the guitar is a very accessible instrument.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by BetThisNameAintTaken View Post
    My daughter spent that much on fees and equipment for my grandson to play baseball. Almost any other instrument would cost 3 or 4 times that.
    Good point, the cost of sports and other activities is impressive, but if you want it bad ...
    But I have to ask, how did he get started? when did he decide he liked it enough to get serious?
    Because how do you know if you like to play guitar if you don't have one, and if you're not sure and you are not rich, you won't get one.
    Even at less that $600, because it is possible to find decent guitars for less, at least decent enough to be a starter guitar.
    That's why I think that having music programs in the schools is important. I hear that they are being cut.

    There's a whole generation of musicians, old enough to write books about their lives, that tell about getting their first guitar and starting a band while in high school. Many of them.
    https://www.guitarworld.com/gw-archi...you-have-do-it

    And it's interesting how many of them say their first guitar was a mail-order from Sears, or something similar.
    http://www.myrareguitars.com/sears-silvertone-guitars

    And then there is the cost of lessons. Online lessons are cheaper than an in-person teacher, but the online lessons cannot provide the motivation and inspiration a live teacher can, and many students need that help to keep going.

    So my point to the guitar companies is to support music teaching in high schools.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by nwhy View Post
    Good point, the cost of sports and other activities is impressive, but if you want it bad ...
    But I have to ask, how did he get started? when did he decide he liked it enough to get serious?
    Because how do you know if you like to play guitar if you don't have one, and if you're not sure and you are not rich, you won't get one.
    Even at less that $600, because it is possible to find decent guitars for less, at least decent enough to be a starter guitar.
    That's why I think that having music programs in the schools is important. I hear that they are being cut.

    There's a whole generation of musicians, old enough to write books about their lives, that tell about getting their first guitar and starting a band while in high school. Many of them.
    https://www.guitarworld.com/gw-archi...you-have-do-it

    And it's interesting how many of them say their first guitar was a mail-order from Sears, or something similar.
    http://www.myrareguitars.com/sears-silvertone-guitars

    And then there is the cost of lessons. Online lessons are cheaper than an in-person teacher, but the online lessons cannot provide the motivation and inspiration a live teacher can, and many students need that help to keep going.

    So my point to the guitar companies is to support music teaching in high schools.
    I agree with music teaching in high school being important.

    When my ex and I were raising our girls, we stretched ourselves financially to help them in any interest they ever had, even when we were just sure it was going to go nowhere. Because we believed, we never knew when something might be THE thing that would catch, and give them goals for the rest of their lives. My daughter has taken up that same philosophy. As far as your question, he never decided to get serious, they just outfitted him to set him up in case he did. Unfortunately he broke his finger at school and is out for the rest of the season.

    If my grandson ever showed an interest in guitar, I would give him my old Strat and Cube 30 amp, then set him up with online lessons, and meet with him once a week for in person coaching.

 

 

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