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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by j cline View Post
    Also, a great trick for figuring out the keys is to look at the major chords. If you see three major chords, as in the C, D and G above, there is only one key it could be in, provided the composer is following the basic/traditional formula of western theory. It has to be G because it's the only key with those three major chords. The three majors will be some combination of the I, IV and V chords of the key. So if you see a Bb, C and F combination, your best bet is it will be in the key of F (IV, V and I respectively). If the progression starts on or centers around the Bb, you can find the "mode" of Bb that corresponds with the key of F (Bb Lydian, since Bb is the 4th note of F) to solo over it, or just play an F scale circling around the root note/arpeggio for the current chord being played. Anyway I could go on and on but I'd never get any playing done. Feel free, fellow guitarists, to correct me if I am wrong on anything.

    I agree with you on the weighted sentence.

    Isn't this a lot easier than trying to find other modes go back to the initial key? What would be the reason to try to figure out the Lydian scale when the chord played is the IV?

  2. #32
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    Nice job Dash… BUT everybody remember that you have various minor scales - Jazz melodic minor, Harmonic minor are the most common + Hungarian gypsy minor etc. etc. so your chords derived from the scales will be different. Sorry if I'm confusing people.

  3. #33
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    Sep 2007
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    you know the strange thing about this post is that it went way off the answer to the original question. which was is G major the relative major to Bminor.

    Ah no, to find the relative minor you count down from the tonic three semitones. That means to find the relative major of a minor, you count up three semitones.

    D major and B minor are relative.

  4. #34
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    Mar 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by skaterstu View Post
    I need to clear something up... I am learning to play all of the minor chords, open and barre.

    With major chords you have the I IV V progression, with VI being the relative minor. If I were to play a chord progression in minor form could I apply this theory?

    An example would be:

    I IV V

    Bm Em Fm


    and would the relative major be the VI, G Maj?

    I have been practicing moving between Minor barre chords in this way, but also been wondering if this is the correct thing to do. If I am way off and wrong please let me know, come to think of it, would be nice to know if I am on the right lines too.

    Thanks

    Stu
    You might find it helpful to really come to grips with the structure of the scales (tones and semi-tones) because the scales normally dictate how the chords are constructed. I have taught harmony and I always stress the importance of understanding the theory.

  5. #35
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    Jul 2013
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    Thanks Dash good job.
    Very well explained. Thanks for taking the time to give such a definitive answer.

  6. #36
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    Dec 2013
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    Smithtown, New York
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    Skaterstu: The short answer is that your progression is correct but it needs to be Bm Em F#7

 

 

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