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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris.Liepe View Post
    BetThisNameAintTaken-
    Here's an article I wrote a few years back about exactly what you're going through with your practice aspirations:
    http://members.jamplay.com/articles/...orkout-concept

    Give it a read and I look forward to hearing your thoughts

    -Chris
    There are some really good ideas and sound advice in that article. I like the idea of having that time slot, sort of like I do for my project song, and I find 30 minutes is about right for something that takes a lot of focus. For me I start burning out on my concentration shortly before the 30 minutes is up. If I try to work beyond that I start getting frustrated and I think that causes me to lose ground. I also find it helps to put my guitar down and do something else at the end of that 30 minutes, because if I don't I find myself wandering back into the project I need the rest from.

    I also like how you handle the "mastering" thing. In my mind that would involve months on that concept. And I do find that when I take a break from something I have been working at, I seem to actually be a little better at it when I come back to it. That makes your 5 days a week thing look really more effective. Right now I feel that pretty much everything I do needs a lot of improvement. Which makes it difficult to figure out where to start. But I think the most immediate thing I need to learn how to do is mute the strings I am not using. Just doing that will make the stuff I already know how to do sound a lot better. I think I will come up with a slogan for that. I am guessing for something that basic a week or two to develop a new habit of holding my picking hand should be good. It will make a short attainable goal for me. I find that reaching an easy goal encourages me to take on more difficult ones.

  2. #12
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    Awesome, ya that's a great focus! You're on the right track for sure! In my live "Pentatonic Precision" course, we deal with string muting on and off quite a bit. As well as in my Blues Roots To Rock course. Let me know if I can be of any more help!
    -Chris Liepe
    Content/Instructor
    JamPlay.com

  3. #13
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    Cool

    I'm in pretty much the same situation as you - taught myself how to play back in HS and only took a couple of formal courses over the years. Played for about 35 years but really never got much better. Put the guitar away about 8-9 years ago and just picked it up again after finding Jamplay. Now I'm trying to get myself back in shape - at least to the point where I was 10 years ago.

    What I've discovered is a world of information that was not available to me years ago that had shown me big holes in my previous learnings. I thought I would jump into a Phase 2 course right away but discovered too many holes in my knowledge so I started watching a Phase electric course and even though alot of the basic material is old hat for me there are lots of valuable nuggets of missing (for me) info that has proven invaluable to me.

    Since the site makes it easy to set up lists of courses you want to investigate I would suggest doing just that and then take them on one at a time - work through each one thoroughly and get the material down well before moving on to the next. This way you stay focused. If you try to tackle multiple ares at the same time you are likely to never master any of them completely.

  4. #14
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    I was just looking at the intro to Chris Liepe's upcoming Live course on "Starting to Record". Great idea. In the intro text Chris says this:

    There are two types of guitar players out there: noodlers and artists. For the moment, forget about classifying your guitar playing as beginner, intermediate or advanced; instead think about what you are creating with your guitar playing. What are you doing with your guitar? Recording is one of the main ways you can begin to give yourself a reason to play. When you create music, even if it is simple music, you cross over from noodler to artist.
    Is the implication here that noodling is bad? What is noodling anyway? According to Google it is fishing for catfish with your bare hands, mostly.

    But there was one definition which was relevant here:
    "informal. improvise or play casually on a musical instrument."

    Improvising sounds like a good thing, so what is noodling to you and why is it not a good thing? And how did it get that name?

  5. #15
    Premium Member palico's Avatar
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    Noodling on guitar is usually a reference to aimless playing. Not playing with a particular purpose. It sometimes is used to mean just playing what you know already that you can execute well. My concept of nodding is more of experimenting with playing without an exacting structure. More like some others idea of improvising. I think it can be good thing in small doses but people can often over do it. Nooding around for two long without a particular goal in mind often doesn't lead to any improvement in playing. In small doses I think it can help your understanding of a concept and improves you improvising skill set.

    I can't speak for the great Liepe , but I think his statement is more around playing without thinking about the impact you want to make on the audience with what you are playing. Shredding is often thought of this way as well sometimes. That form is playing very fast because you can not because the piece of music calls for it or that you trying to convey an emotion with it. Showing off if you will. Steve Via in interviews from time to time doesn't seem to like being called a shredder and seems to point his music back to the melody he is using. So the music is about the emotion it conveys not the technical ability of the player. So the movement is the though process, not just playing a lick because you can, it's in key etc.. but playing it because it makes a artistic statement.
    Phileos High Energy passionate Music with Heart and a bit of Southern Attitude.

  6. #16
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    That was a excellent insightful response! I agree with everything you said.

  7. #17
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    Default noodling

    I like what palico said above, that makes a lot of sense. I was asking why it's called 'noodling'. I haven't found anything that says so, but it looks like it's just the guitar version of 'doodling'. Wikipedia: "A doodle is a drawing made while a person's attention is otherwise occupied." It's associated with children and boredom. However, not everybody sees it as a bad thing, if it's done right.

    http://www.annsdoodles.com/index.php/artists-statement says "By definition "Doodling" is something you do whilst your concentration is on something else ie. whilst on the phone or in a boring classroom, even whilst watching tv. In some ways I feel I have turned this definition around. I seem to have my concentration on doodling whilst life itself happens around me. However as in the definition of doodling, my art does come from my subconscious, my dreams and my imagination and is therefore a big part of who I am." and "Although I have been "doodling" on a daily basis from childhood, it has only been in the last few years that I have learnt why I doodle, and how beneficial it is to a person's wellbeing."

    So, when you noodle, pay attention! focus. be creative. The last word belongs to Santana:
    I began to really learn about soloing and respecting the song and melody. I think too many guitar players forget that and get stuck in the guitar itself, playing lots of notes -- "noodling," I call it. It's like they're playing too fast to play attention. Some people thrive on that, but sooner or later the bird's got to land in the mist and you got to play the melody. Imagine if the song was a woman -- what would she say? Did you forget me? Are you mad at me?
    I still hear what Miles Davis used to say about musicians who play too much: "You know, the less you play the more you get paid for each note."

    (The Universal Tone: Bringing my Story to Light)

  8. #18
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    These issues are all being brought to light in the new rut busting series.

 

 

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