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  1. #11
    Premium Member BradArmpitt's Avatar
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    All of my favorite classic rock guitarists listed two people as being their idols: Chuck Berry and Scottie Moore. What they didn't know was that Berry and Moore had a guitar idol, too, and HER name was Sister Rosetta Tharpe, Gospel's First Superstar and the Godmother of Rock n Roll. Berry's signature double stops were taken directly from her repertoire, and her influence can be heard on almost any Elvis recording that Moore contributed to.

    Rosetta was a child prodigy, starting guitar at age 4 and performing publicly by age 7. There's a very interesting documentary about her, and her influence on rock n roll, here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W_n0vkzc8PU (watch the first 30 seconds and you'll get a taste of her playing)

    If you listen closely to the intro of this video it sounds a lot like the intro to Heartbreak Hotel, but this was recorded at least 10 years before Elvis burst onto the music scene. At this point, she had already been playing professionally for over 20 years.

    Last edited by BradArmpitt; 02-13-2017 at 04:33 AM.
    "Practice, practice, practice. Practice until you get a guitar welt on your chest. If it makes you feel good, don't stop until you see the blood from your fingers. Then you'll know you're on to something." - Ted Nugent

  2. #12
    Moderator jbooth's Avatar
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    I had never heard of her. Thank you for the video.
    Co-Founder and Content Specialist at JamPlay.com

  3. #13
    Premium Member BradArmpitt's Avatar
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    Today's unsung guitar hero is Roy Clark (who, contrary to popular opinion, is still very much alive). Clark is best known for hosting Hee Haw, a nationally televised country variety show, from 1969 to 1992, but he is also an important and influential figure in country music, both as a performer and in helping to popularize the genre.

    Clark is highly regarded and renowned as a guitarist and banjo player, and is also skilled on classical guitar and several other instruments. Although he has had hit songs as a pop vocalist (e.g., "Yesterday, When I Was Young" and "Thank God and Greyhound"), his instrumental skill has had an enormous effect on generations of bluegrass and country musicians. He has been a member of the Grand Ole Opry since 1987, and in 2009 was inducted into the The Country Music Hall of Fame.

    Roy Clark can flat out play a guitar, but yet he never makes the favorites lists. This video is obviously from Roy's younger days, and provides a good insight into his sense of humor, too:



    And here's a bonus video from an appearance Roy made on the original Odd Couple tv show showcasing some of his other guitar playing skills. This one gets really interesting:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhiKgeJV3k0
    Last edited by BradArmpitt; 02-13-2017 at 09:28 PM.
    "Practice, practice, practice. Practice until you get a guitar welt on your chest. If it makes you feel good, don't stop until you see the blood from your fingers. Then you'll know you're on to something." - Ted Nugent

  4. #14
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    [QUOTE=BradArmpitt;107965]
    Quote Originally Posted by BD-cgull View Post

    I haven't even begun to think about alternate tunings yet. That boggles my mind thinking how all those notes moved around. lol I'm not that far along in my journey just yet.

    I wasn't able to find the album, but I did find the song "Mrs. Pinnocchi's Guitar." I liked it. I found another song she did called "Since You've Been Gone" that I liked a lot, too.
    Definitely a gifted song writer but you asked about guitarists so I picked pieces that showcased her playing. Gret pick on Sister Rosetta btw.
    Last edited by BD-cgull; 02-14-2017 at 11:07 AM.

  5. #15
    Premium Member crosstour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbooth View Post
    I had never heard of her. Thank you for the video.
    +1 for Sister Rosetta Sharp.

  6. #16
    Premium Member BradArmpitt's Avatar
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    Acclaimed axeman Jimmy “Chank” Nolen is widely celebrated in the funk community as one of the genre’s most influential guitarists. During his long tenure as lead guitarist for James Brown’s band, he played on a number of seminal tracks that helped launch funk music - which became an important and integral part of contemporary music. Nolen is credited with inventing the chicken-scratch guitar lick, a signature of the rhythm-driven funk sound. He played his famous chicken-scratch lick on Brown’s 1965 classic “Papa’s Got a Brand New Bag,” which is considered by many as the first funk record. Due to his creation of the chicken-scratch lick and his pivotal contributions to a slew of influential funk tracks, Nolen is known as the “Father of Funk Guitar.”

    Nolen showed off his guitar skills on the smokin’ rhythm-and-blues instrumental below. Nolen wrote and arranged the track, which was released in 1956 on Federal Records, a subsidiary of Cincinnati-based King Records.

    An interesting aside is that I happen to be from Cincinnati, and at the moment there is a legal dispute about the future of the building that housed King Records. It's scheduled to be demolished, but historians (and now the city council) have been fighting to keep it intact due to its importance in music history.

    http://www.cincinnati.com/story/news...ding/96765394/

    Last edited by BradArmpitt; 02-15-2017 at 11:56 AM.
    "Practice, practice, practice. Practice until you get a guitar welt on your chest. If it makes you feel good, don't stop until you see the blood from your fingers. Then you'll know you're on to something." - Ted Nugent

  7. #17
    Premium Member BradArmpitt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BD-cgull View Post

    Definitely a gifted song writer but you asked about guitarists so I picked pieces that showcased her playing. Gret pick on Sister Rosetta btw.
    I like Cheryl's playing for the same reason I've always liked Jim Croce's playing: It sounds deceptively simple on the first listen, but if you pay closer attention there is actually a lot going on melodically. It all gets kind of obscured under the words, unfortunately, but it is meant to be an accompaniment, after all, and not the 'feature' of the song, so... Both Cheryl and Jim are/were very much songwriters over guitarists, although both play very well.

    Croce's songwriting partner, Maury Muehleisen, was an excellent guitarist, as well. Are you familiar with him? If you've ever seen Jim Croce perform on video, Maury was probably sitting to his right playing along. He died in the same plane crash as Jim, unfortunately.

    Fingerstyle is definitely on my to-do list. I can already see how some of the techniques could benefit my own playing. I think I'll showcase a fingerpicker for my next post here. He never gets mentioned in the lists, either, but he is an amazing fingerpicker.
    Last edited by BradArmpitt; 02-15-2017 at 12:29 PM.
    "Practice, practice, practice. Practice until you get a guitar welt on your chest. If it makes you feel good, don't stop until you see the blood from your fingers. Then you'll know you're on to something." - Ted Nugent

  8. #18
    Premium Member BradArmpitt's Avatar
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    Albert Lee, who hails from Leominster, England, of all places, is perhaps the most influential electric country guitar player alive today. He is widely known for his fingerstyle and hybrid picking techniques. Lee is a prolific musician, both in the studio and on tour, and has played with many famous musicians from a wide range of genres. Though he has never achieved much commercial success, fellow musicians, including Eric Clapton and Steve Howe, have described Lee as a living legend.

    It is not an exaggeration to say that the hybrid picking banjo-style rolls and hot chicken-pickin' licks heard on his song “Country Boy” have been studied and emulated by just about every guitarist in Nashville. Lee has played with country icons including Emmylou Harris and Ricky Skaggs and continues to tour today with his band Hogan’s Heroes.

    Lee was also responsible for the Everly Brothers' 1983 reunion concert and was its musical director. He played regularly with the Everlys for over twenty years.

    Last edited by BradArmpitt; 02-16-2017 at 06:33 AM.
    "Practice, practice, practice. Practice until you get a guitar welt on your chest. If it makes you feel good, don't stop until you see the blood from your fingers. Then you'll know you're on to something." - Ted Nugent

  9. #19
    Premium Member wayne4d's Avatar
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    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WpQToVwgEfU

    Pete Huttlinger. He was John Denvers guitarist. Never would have heard of him if I hadn't run across one of those "RIP - We've lost another great musician" type articles.

  10. #20
    Premium Member BradArmpitt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wayne4d View Post
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WpQToVwgEfU

    Pete Huttlinger. He was John Denvers guitarist. Never would have heard of him if I hadn't run across one of those "RIP - We've lost another great musician" type articles.
    I am not familiar with Pete Huttlinger. I will read up on him. Thanks for sharing.
    "Practice, practice, practice. Practice until you get a guitar welt on your chest. If it makes you feel good, don't stop until you see the blood from your fingers. Then you'll know you're on to something." - Ted Nugent

 

 

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