Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1

    Default Question about minor pentatonic scale

    Hi all, i have a question about the minor pentatonic scale.It seems that there are 5 positions, but different sites have positions that differ.
    If there are 5 positions, which is correct?
    Thanks in advance

    Hammy

    5-positions-a-minor-pentatonic.jpg
    minor-pentatonic.jpg

  2. #2
    Moderator jbooth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Fort Collins, CO
    Posts
    3,066

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
    Hi all, i have a question about the minor pentatonic scale.It seems that there are 5 positions, but different sites have positions that differ.
    If there are 5 positions, which is correct?
    Thanks in advance

    Hammy

    5-positions-a-minor-pentatonic.jpg
    minor-pentatonic.jpg
    I would check out some of our lessons on the scale for more information, but I'd just like to give you my succinct answer.

    If you think of the minor pentatonic scale as just as sequence of notes, you realize the scale can be played all over the neck, in many different positions. Generally when people are teaching it, they break it down into useful boxes that are easier to memorize and use.

    What I've noticed is sometimes people call a certain box "position 1" while another instructor calls that box "position 3." This can seem really confusion. Instead I recommend you just focus on memorizing the shape, and not worry about what the position is actually called, or how it is numbered, because that doesn't really matter. In general there are 5 shapes that are taught and learning all 5 of those is important.

    And remember, those aren't the only ways you can play the scale on the guitar! You can play the scale on 1 string going up, you can play it in different octaves, etc. The shapes are just guidelines to make things easier.
    Co-Founder and Content Specialist at JamPlay.com

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jbooth View Post
    I would check out some of our lessons on the scale for more information, but I'd just like to give you my succinct answer.

    If you think of the minor pentatonic scale as just as sequence of notes, you realize the scale can be played all over the neck, in many different positions. Generally when people are teaching it, they break it down into useful boxes that are easier to memorize and use.

    What I've noticed is sometimes people call a certain box "position 1" while another instructor calls that box "position 3." This can seem really confusion. Instead I recommend you just focus on memorizing the shape, and not worry about what the position is actually called, or how it is numbered, because that doesn't really matter. In general there are 5 shapes that are taught and learning all 5 of those is important.

    And remember, those aren't the only ways you can play the scale on the guitar! You can play the scale on 1 string going up, you can play it in different octaves, etc. The shapes are just guidelines to make things easier.
    Thank you jbooth, i understand better now, i'll investigate further on here, thanks again.

  4. #4
    Premium Member palico's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    677

    Default

    Jbooth has it nailed. But just to add a bit of food for thought. Penta means five, so the scale has 5 notes. So the common reason is this taught in 5 different positions is one starting from each note of the scale. It means once you learn the 5 positions you have the entire range of scale cover for the octave. Although as Jbooth pointed out locking your self into "just" that position or another one limits you, no reason you can't mix them up.

  5. #5

    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by palico View Post
    Jbooth has it nailed. But just to add a bit of food for thought. Penta means five, so the scale has 5 notes. So the common reason is this taught in 5 different positions is one starting from each note of the scale. It means once you learn the 5 positions you have the entire range of scale cover for the octave. Although as Jbooth pointed out locking your self into "just" that position or another one limits you, no reason you can't mix them up.
    Thank you palico

 

 

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Banner