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  1. #1
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    Default need help clean the fretboard.

    Hi, a friend of mine gave me a strat style guitar rogue by squire, the fretboard is rosewood very dark look like the guitar is been sit forever and the string is rusted.so how can I clean the rosewood fretboard . i saw on internet people saw use a steel wool0000 and alcohol 100 percent .and 1 more thing is the bridge is bend to right hand side is that normal.
    Last edited by tommylam; 12-29-2015 at 10:39 PM.

  2. #2
    Premium Member palico's Avatar
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    0000 Steel wool will clean the junk off the fretboard nicely. Use it with the grain of the board and don't scrub too hard. It it has built up junk you can use the edge of a old credit card/store card to scrap off the heavy stuff, again not too agressive on it. Naptaha (sp?) is great cleaning agent as well if it really really needs something stronger. Just remember to put some lemon oil or one of the off the self guitar products afterwards to put some oils back into that board. As for the bend bridge you might have to replace some of the bend parts unless it's not worth it, or not so bad that it throws in intonation too bad.

  3. #3
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    Can you post a photo of the bridge? Guitarfetish.com has good quality replacement parts for very reasonable prices. I bought a new bridge with a massive brass trem block that really improved the tone and sustain.

  4. #4
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    Also a single-edged razor blade held at a shallow angle and used lightly can clean crud off and get right to the edge of the frets.

  5. #5
    Premium Member slighter's Avatar
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    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vcYS117qyco - works for me - changing strings too easy peasy. I use linseed oil myself - dirt cheap - 7 bucks will last you a lifetime
    Last edited by slighter; 01-02-2016 at 03:28 AM.

  6. #6
    Premium Member slope's Avatar
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    When you get your fretboard cleaned up you might wanna make a habit to run a soft cloth over your strings and fretboard after each practice. Keeps things clean, and makes strings last a little longer. There are also those dirt cheap fretboard cleaners. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GL0UXtIIXBE

    Clamp the fret+string cleaner around the strings and run it up and down the neck. Works like a charm. And it takes care of strings and fretboard at the same time. Support you local guitar shop if they got em, or you get 2-3 of those for like 10 $ with free shipping from China. Perfect to keep in the gig bag as well as they don't take up much space.
    Last edited by slope; 02-25-2018 at 11:53 AM.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by palico View Post
    0000 Steel wool will clean the junk off the fretboard nicely. Use it with the grain of the board and don't scrub too hard. It it has built up junk you can use the edge of a old credit card/store card to scrap off the heavy stuff, again not too agressive on it. Naptaha (sp?) is great cleaning agent as well if it really really needs something stronger. Just remember to put some lemon oil or one of the off the self guitar products afterwards to put some oils back into that board. As for the bend bridge you might have to replace some of the bend parts unless it's not worth it, or not so bad that it throws in intonation too bad.
    I have read too many dangers of using steel wool on an electric guitar. Your pickups are magnets, you can mask them off, but any dust anywhere on that guitar that you miss when cleaning up can and will work their way toward the magnets. It has been known to short pickup coils out. There really no reason to take the risk anymore with products like Gorgamyte on the market. It does just as good of job on the frets, and the fingerboard, with no risk of steel dust making it's way to your pickups. You can use it on maple boards too. Also you want to be careful with the lemon oil as too much of it will cause your wood to swell and loosen your frets. Use it very sparingly.

  8. #8
    Premium Member palico's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BetThisNameAintTaken View Post
    I have read too many dangers of using steel wool on an electric guitar. Your pickups are magnets, you can mask them off, but any dust anywhere on that guitar that you miss when cleaning up can and will work their way toward the magnets. It has been known to short pickup coils out. There really no reason to take the risk anymore with products like Gorgamyte on the market. It does just as good of job on the frets, and the fingerboard, with no risk of steel dust making it's way to your pickups. You can use it on maple boards too. Also you want to be careful with the lemon oil as too much of it will cause your wood to swell and loosen your frets. Use it very sparingly.
    Logically I can say that makes sense but you use 0000 Steel wool and you don't scrub the pickups with it. Just a light polish on the frets. Done it for years on many guitars and never an issue. Stewmac and likely others do make some specialty items for that now but I've never been the type to spend money worrying about minor things that likely will never happen. Yes you overdo the fret board with any kind of oils it can swell a board. Also not using anything will shrink the board and cause the frets to pop-up/out too.
    Phileos High Energy passionate Music with Heart and a bit of Southern Attitude.

  9. #9
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    You shouldn't have to hydrate your fingerboard if your humidity is in the 40 to 70 percent range. Ideal is 50%. If your guitar was built right (use of drying room etc) the rosewood won't start giving up it's moister until you get to 30% or below. Here in Kansas that is not an issue except on really cold days in the winter. I have an acoustic guitar with a rosewood finger board I bought in 2004. I have never used oil on it and it has absolutely no issues.

    If you live in a dry area, such as Denver or any place in the mountains, where humidity rarely gets over 30%, you need to use either oil, or a humidifier. Personally I would use oil as an insurance policy and keep my humidifier running. But you only need a drop or two spread out over the fingerboard, and then only twice a year at the most.

 

 

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