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  1. #1
    Administrator Jason.Mounce's Avatar
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    Default What's Your Production Style

    We all have different likes and dislikes when it comes to the music we listen to and the music we create. With that being said, what you do prefer? Do you like simplistic arrangements and production techniques, or perhaps you do you like over the top productions? Maybe you land somewhere in the middle?

    Since I started producing around 2000, I have always been fixated on the process and the level of creativity that you can achieve when you combine cutting edge post-production technology with layered and complex arrangements.

    At the same time sometimes it's really nice to listen to something with just a properly mic'd acoustic and let the instrument do all the talking. In that respect I'd have to say my preference really depends on my mood.

    Here's a couple examples of a few tunes that fit both extremes well.

    BT - Vervoeren


    The Early November - 1000 Times a Day


    What's your favorite production style?
    Jason Mounce
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    Emil Werstler on Active Pickups:
    Pros: you can put them in a 2 X 4 and sound like zakk wylde
    Cons: you can put them in a 2 X 4 and sound like zakk wylde

  2. #2
    Premium Member HoppyRoo's Avatar
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    first track sounds entirely digital... i have fun playing in FL Studio making similar ( although not nearly as cool sounding ) stuff... but why do you call that "post-production"? isn't that entire song made in post-production then??

    i would never think about using 1/2 of the fx / vSt available for stuff like a regular guitar track. you could tho... try gross beat or effectrix for some really insane stuff just on a simple acoustic... pretty cool.

  3. #3
    Premium Member palico's Avatar
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    My approach has always been I want the recording to sound *mostly* like me or the band I'm working with does live. I'm not against layering multiple complex parts per say and I will overdup stuff sometimes, but I use it very sparingly. As for post production effects, EQ, etc... I will use stuff the enhances the sound but not drasiticly. For example, I'll use tube EQ or Tube type effect on at least one track on nearly everything I record. That is because I like the mellow warm sounds of Tube. The real deal is better than the VST versions but even those are pretty good. Other effects such as EQ, delay etc... I usually only use for creating sepertions in the instruments and to put instruments in proper space in the mix. So when I record guitars, I may use a good bit of effects but they are coming off the guitar rig before I record. I never record my guitars dry, the effects change the way you play and to me the most important factor is the peformance itself and capturing that. After that the mix down work is to me all about making the medium (CD/MP3) work best to capture what I acutally heard when we performed it. Again I'm not against using the studio as an instrument itself but it's just not my taste and how I like to approach it.

  4. #4
    Moderator AaronMiller's Avatar
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    Default

    My music tastes have grown in odd ways. I like EDM quite a bit now. However for rock, I prefer the organic route.

    EDM is great for background noise. But I really enjoy music played by humans.

    If I'm supposed to be listening to a human play a performance...I don't want overdubs/copypaste and all that bs. To me, the best musicians are the ones that play "overdubs" on one guitar and sound good doing it.

    If Rebel Yell was recorded today with a modern band...would they need 2 guitar players to play that intro?....

    I'm not the biggest Pantera fan but I really like how there was no rhythm under Dime's solos on the early recordings. It's honest and true.

    I hear songs on the radio (like the latest Linkin Park or Three Days Grace) and they are just super simple songs that are over produced. Ultimately for me it is an empty song with no real guts that uses production to add novelty.

    Go back and listen to Appetite for Destruction or Kill 'Em All...those are great records/songs with just the right amount of production.

    After you hear the good stuff that comes from heart and years of dedication...it's hard to stomach the "phoning it in" stuff.

    Of course, I think it's odd that women wear makeup and I'm sick of politicians not being able to give straight answers. So clearly I am on the fringe. :-p

    TL: DR If it's EDM...layer it on but don't "mess" with my rock n' roll!

  5. #5
    Premium Member Doc Rod's Avatar
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    Those r good examples of the extremes indeed..... I don`t like much pure digital music, but if u r going to be just voice and guitar, u got to put lot`s of dynamics on it. Or else will sound boring. My challenge is to evolve technically enough to sound great using just a few gadgets.....
    Don`t worry, be happy.

  6. #6
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    In general, I go for very minimal yet high quality production. I grew up listening to bands like Soundgarden, Nirvana, Aerosmith, STP, Pantera, etc., so the whole minimal production route of capturing the raw, live sound of the rhythm section is what always sounds right to me. I love the old Jane's Addiction records, but I have a hard time listening to the new ones because of all the b.s. modern production. I like there to be fewer sounds to focus on in the mix, and make every part sound absolutely gigantic. When engineering or mixing, I try to emulate my heroes that do that kind of thing the best - Scott Litt, Steve Albini, Brendan O'Brian, etc.

    Most of the time when I record guitar, what you hear is exactly what I tracked. I almost never play with reverb except for clean guitar parts, and I almost always track with effects. Sometimes I'll add delay and do some light eq'ing, but that's it. Vocals are just the opposite. I record them completely dry with no compression. It can be hard to notice small mistakes if you're listening to something tracked with effects. I figure if a vocal take sounds absolutely amazing with nothing on it, it's only going to sound better when you add things like reverb, delay, overdrive, etc.

  7. #7
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    I like both, but if I had to choose I'd go with the song because I like hearing the instruments as they sound. In production, just a little reverb and panning are helpful and nothing else is really needed to make instruments sound awesome, imo.

  8. #8
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    I prefer the music to be as raw as possible. As little EQ or reverb from the board as possible. Obviously you'll need to EQ, but I'm talking about using auto-tune or filtering out string squeak, or over dubbing... blah blah blah.. Music is the closest thing we have to manifesting the power of true creation, if it doesn't sound as raw and emotional as a wave crashing on the beach or a breeze passing through the trees, then it's no good to my ears. If we don't aspire to be as moving as possible, what's the point? money? what good is that when we die. Move the soul.

  9. #9
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    I like it pure and simple. Possibly the instruments should be played in one track like it would be live, maybe a few little overdubs but that's it.
    dshow

  10. #10
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    Whatever best serves the song. There's no higher moral ground or nobility in producing a song one way over another. A lot of the "pure" and "minimalist" examples that people may believe are very simply produced more likely have a ton of complex engineering behind them. But, good producing/engineering is often the kind that the listener doesn't even notice or in fact, makes something sound simple when its really not. Its just another creative process, and as such, is completely subjective. One person's version of "just right" will be way over-produced to another, or a stripped-down production that's just right to a
    set of ears will sound severely under-produced to someone else.

 

 

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